nature Archives -
Select Page
Adventure Guide Button
Take A Trip Into The Heart Of Romance

Take A Trip Into The Heart Of Romance

Take A Trip Into The Heart Of Romance Whether you’re looking for a cozy winter getaway or the ultimate romantic experience, Transylvania County has a keepsake box full of great ideas to help you show your sweetheart just how much you care. There’s no better place to up your romance game than in our area, especially in Brevard or historic Toxaway. Here are a few suggestions certain to score major points with your main squeeze. Snuggle Up From rustic cabins to luxury inns, our charming accommodations are sure to light your fire. A Great Gatsby-era, colonial revival treasure, The Bromfield Inn, just a short walk from downtown Brevard, offers luxurious accommodations in a beautiful park-like setting. For a wonderful massage nearby, Elements Wellness Spa in downtown is the perfect place to relax and refresh. If the Toxaway area is more your style, the lovely, historic Greystone Inn is a perfect getaway, where you can enjoy a side-by-side couple’s massage in the spa and then sit by the fire while over looking the lake. Brevard and Transylvania County offer a host of perfect love nests for your Valentine’s getaway. Click here to find your sweet spot, including our winter specials. Dinner Date A cozy, wonderful dinner is at the top of any Valentine’s celebration and for good reason. It’s a chance to connect and enjoy a special meal in a magical setting. If you’re in downtown Brevard, you’ll want to consider The Bohemian with its globally-inspired dishes, and Wild Morel with its French-and Italian-inspired rustic cuisine. In historic Toxaway,... Read More
Community Forest Bathing & Nature Therapy Retreat

Community Forest Bathing & Nature Therapy Retreat

Reset after the busy holidays and start 2024 off on the right foot with a restorative retreat on New Year’s Day, Monday, Jan. 1 from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Pink Beds trailhead in Pisgah National Forest. Join certified nature and forest therapy guide Kelly Bruce for a peaceful afternoon in the healing forests of the Blue Ridge Mountains filled with intentional nature connection. The practice of forest bathing encourages participants to slow down, quiet the mind and awaken the senses. Through a series of mindfulness invitations, guests will have the opportunity to linger in the present in the moment, deepening their connection with nature, community, and enjoying the many gifts of the forest. We’ll conclude our retreat with a wild foraged tea ceremony and snacks, reflecting and releasing 2023, then setting intentions for 2024. Inspired by Shinrin-Yoku, the Japanese practice of immersing oneself in the restorative qualities of a forest environment, forest bathing invites guests to spend time in nature in a way that invites healing for ourselves, our fraught ecosystems, and our community. “A few of the benefits of forest bathing include improved mental and physical health, enhanced wellbeing and creativity,” says Kelly Bruce, a guide certified by the Association of Nature and Forest Therapy, and owner of Natural Wanders. “I will lead you on a journey through the forest, weaving mindfulness, breathwork, forest bathing and nature therapy together for a restorative afternoon. Words don’t do this practice justice, you simply need to experience it for... Read More
Artful Adventures: Exploring the Arts in Brevard & Transylvania County

Artful Adventures: Exploring the Arts in Brevard & Transylvania County

Artful Adventures: Exploring the Arts in Brevard & Transylvania County Thanks to its surrounding natural beauty, Brevard has long attracted artists across every discipline, turning the area into a moveable feast of memorable art experiences. This month, the Adventurist sat down with Kathy King, Executive Director of the Transylvania Community Arts Council, to provide some insights into what makes our artistic community so special for residents and visitors alike. And since it’s getting to be “that time of year,” Kathy offered to provide some great shopping suggestions for those of you who are looking for that special something to slip under the Christmas tree.  Q&A Q&A: Kathy, tell us a little about yourself. Kathy has a fascinating background. She’s been a corporate attorney, a wedding and fine art photographer, and an educator. All three disciplines provided her with the perfect background to take over the reins of the Arts Council in 2021. She says, “It just seems like everything I have been doing led me to this place. I absolutely love the Arts Council, its mission, and what I do every day. And I wouldn’t be doing it if I didn’t!” Q&A Q&A: What is the Transylvania Community Arts Council? “Transylvania Community Arts Council was formed over fifty years ago and, initially, its primary purpose was holding an annual “Festival of the Arts.” In 1983, we received our 501(c)3 status and really began to expand. Today, one of the most important things we do is advocate for the arts... Read More
Keeping History Alive: How Brevard Became a Pioneering Civil Rights Community

Keeping History Alive: How Brevard Became a Pioneering Civil Rights Community

Keeping History Alive: How Brevard Became a Pioneering Civil Rights Community We invite you to learn more about a landmark effort by Brevard and Transylvania County’s African American citizens who made history – and the extraordinary African American community that is sharing their history in exciting new ways.   Pictured: Edith Darity Sometimes change requires courage. And tenacity. And an unwavering belief in the American Dream. Those are the qualities that describe Brevard’s African American community in the early 60s. At the time, virtually every school in the South was still segregated, despite the 1954 Brown vs. Board of Education decision handed down by the Supreme Court that declared segregated schools unconstitutional. In Brevard and Transylvania County, high school age African American students were bussed 42 miles every day to attend an all-Black high school in Henderson County. Enter Reverend Samuel A. Raper, who encouraged local African Americans to form the Transylvania Citizens Improvement Organization in 1960. After twice being turned down by the local Board of Education, these citizens took their case to the Federal Courts – and won – helping Transylvania County become the first desegregated school system in North Carolina. Brevard resident Edith Darity lived that history. For the first three years of high school, she was bussed to Henderson County. But for her senior year, in 1963, she attended Brevard High School as part of the first fully integrated class – all thanks to the landmark efforts of the Transylvania Citizens Improvement Organization. “Everything was... Read More
Cradle of Forestry Fee Free Tuesdays

Cradle of Forestry Fee Free Tuesdays

Join us at the Cradle of Forestry any Tuesday throughout the 2023 season with FREE admission days for all! Walk the paved trails, pack a picnic lunch for your friends and family, explore the Discovery Center and make it a fun filled day at the Cradle deep in the heart of Pisgah National Forest. These complimentary admission days are made possible due to the generous support received from the North Carolina Museum of Natural... Read More
The Legend of Tommy Hodges Outdoor Drama

The Legend of Tommy Hodges Outdoor Drama

The Cradle of Forestry is excited to offer visitors their incredibly outdoor drama, “The Legend of Tommy Hodges,” on Friday, October 27 and Saturday, October 28. Each evening, there will be two showings offered at 6:30pm and 8:00pm. Tickets are limited to a total of 75 participants per showing. During this unique and exciting outdoor performance, audiences will travel back in time to the year 1901 and hear yarns about the legendary Tommy Hodges, a fictional student of the Biltmore Forest School. Audiences will be led around the Biltmore Campus Trail by different characters from the play and watch as the story unfolds around them from all sides. In addition, audience members are invited to dress up in Biltmore Forest School-era clothing (early 1900’s) to fully immerse themselves in the event and take part in the story. The show is a one-mile-long experience, as the audience walks the well-lit trail to see the entire play and takes about an hour. The story is better suitable for ages six and up. Audience members are asked to dress warmly, wear comfortable walking shoes, bring a flashlight, and although we love our pets as much as you, we ask that you please leave them at home. Ponchos and other rain gear are welcome if the weather is drizzly, but please leave umbrellas at home so everyone has a chance to see the show unobstructed. The Legend of Tommy Hodges is a homegrown amateur production presented by FIND Team Members and our Cradle... Read More
Camping in the Old Style

Camping in the Old Style

The Cradle of Forestry in America invites the public to explore a re-created campsite of the early 1900’s during its “Camping in the Old Style” event. A classic camping interpretive team known as the Acorn Patrol demonstrates the low-tech/high-skill approach as practiced in the outdoors during what some historians consider the Golden Age of Camping. During this time in history, the Pisgah National Forest was in its infancy. City folk were discovering the joys of outdoor recreation. It was a time when camping meant sleeping under canvas and cooking over an open fire. Here in the wood smoke, surrounded by the outdoor gear of a by-gone day, the traditional skills of camping will be practiced in the Cradle of Forestry’s scenic setting in the corral along the Biltmore Campus Trail. Visitors can see fires ignited by flint, steel and friction, old-style campfire cookery, four different styles of period shelters, and traditional camp tools in use. Each camper has expertise in various aspects of woodcraft, history, nature study, and welcomes interacting with visitors and questions. “Camping in the Old Style” is inspired by Horace Kephart, author of Camping and Woodcraft, originally published in 1906. Kephart’s approach to enjoying the outdoors holds lessons for today’s modern... Read More
Cultivating Grace, Power & Intuition: A Women’s Self-Renewal Program

Cultivating Grace, Power & Intuition: A Women’s Self-Renewal Program

Come circle up with a wise, kind and deeply authentic group of 20 women and we’ll journey into winter together. Join self-care author Renee Trudeau Oct. 26 -Jan. 26 in Brevard, NC (45 min. from Asheville) over eight Thursday evenings from 6:30-8:30 p.m. for Cultivating Grace, Power & Intuition: A Women’s Self-Renewal Program. Details and registration:... Read More
The Legacy of Indigenous People in Transylvania County

The Legacy of Indigenous People in Transylvania County

The Legacy of Indigenous People in Transylvania County North Carolina has the largest population of Indigenous people east of the Mississippi River and the eighth-largest Indigenous population in the United States. With their rich and diverse cultures, traditions, and histories, Indigenous people have made important contributions to our state and county. As we celebrate North Carolina’s “Year of the Trail,” we’re delighted to share an interview we had with Keith Parker, whose fascinating and varied life experiences have contributed to his knowledge and insights about Indigenous cultures, specifically the Cherokee in Transylvania County. Keith grew up in Dunn’s Rock with Cherokee neighbors, absorbing their stories and mythologies. He graduated from Brevard High School and went on to earn B.A., B.D., Ph.D., and Dipl. Analytical Psychology degrees from multiple institutions, including Berea College, Southern Seminary, and the C.G. Jung Institute in Zurich. Keith’s educational pursuits were interrupted by a stint as a frogman for the Navy, where he led the primary emergency team for NASA’s Mercury program (counting astronaut John Glenn as a friend). Later, he taught counseling and history at a theological seminary in Zurich for more than two decades. In addition to publishing numerous articles on history, church history, and psychology, he has written extensively about Transylvania County and Cherokee history. Most notably, Keith is the author of Seven Cherokee Myths: Creation, Fire, the Primordial Parents, the Nature of Evil, the Family, Universal Suffering, and Communal Obligation. Q&A Q&A: Keith, tell us a little about your connection to... Read More
Forest Bathing: How To Cleanse Your Spirit

Forest Bathing: How To Cleanse Your Spirit

Forest Bathing: How To Cleanse Your Spirit As a part of North Carolina’s Year of The Trail celebration, “Wellness and Trails” is the theme for August. In conjunction with that theme, this month’s blog is about Forest Bathing, which has become a popular activity for folks who love the outdoors. If you’re new to the concept, you’ll enjoy this fascinating interview we conducted with Dr. Mattie Decker, a certified Nature and Forest Therapy Guide, mindfulness teacher and a retired professor of education.   Q&A Q&A: Mattie, tell us a little about yourself. “I’m a lifelong educator who grew up in Savannah, Georgia. I got my teaching degree from Georgia State University and then went on to teach in rural Appalachia in northeast Georgia. Later, I spent ten years in Colorado. I’ve always had a deep connection with nature, and Colorado deepened that relationship. Ultimately, we moved to Arkansas where I finished my master’s thesis. I then went on to pursue my doctorate at the University of Memphis. Over the years, I’ve also spent a great amount of time in Finland, studying and researching their innovative teacher education program. In Norway, I became a certified Nature and Forest Therapy Guide.” Q&A Q&A: What is forest bathing and how long has it been around? “Forest bathing is derived from the Japanese practice shinrin-yoku, which means forest bath. It was developed in the 80’s when Japan was in the midst of their tech boom. People were dying from a wide range of diseases in unprecedented numbers.... Read More
Mountain Monarch Festival

Mountain Monarch Festival

The 2nd annual Mountain Monarch Festival will celebrate the monarch butterfly during its migration and bring attention to the species’ declining numbers. Gorges State Park lies along the monarch’s migratory route. The butterflies can be seen in late September each year flying over the park’s visitor center on their way south to the high-elevation fir forests of Mexico’s Neovolcanic Mountains, where they overwinter until early spring. The festival will offer educational programs and exhibits featuring the monarch butterfly, including monarch-themed children’s crafts, live music, a food truck, a festive photo board, local art for sale and a Monarch Migration Passport to lead families through monarch-themed activities. Monarch butterflies have two sets of deep orange and black wings and a wingspan of three to four inches. The migratory subspecies of the monarch was recently added to the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s “red list” of the most threatened species on Earth and is now listed as endangered. Those who wish to help monarchs return to healthy population levels can plant locally native milkweed and nectar flowers in their yards and support efforts to reduce pesticide use. The Mountain Monarch Festival is sponsored by Friends of Gorges State Park and organized in partnership with Monarch Watch, N.C. Cooperative Extension Service, and N.C. Department of Commerce. Admission, music, and programs at the festival will be free. The park requests that those who plan to attend register by clicking here. The festival will be held rain or... Read More
Hike with Llamas at Earthshine

Hike with Llamas at Earthshine

Enjoy a one-of-a-kind hike in the beautiful Blue Ridge mountains with our friendly llamas! Hikers will learn about our famous llamas’ interesting histories and how to safely handle the animals before heading out on a hike with gorgeous mountaintop views on our private trails. Each family/group gets 1 to 3 lovable llamas to share and there’s plenty of time for llama cuddles and, of course, llama selfies! This moderate hike is around 1 mile long and requires walking uphill on rocky and sometimes slippery terrain. This experience lasts approximately an hour and a half. We welcome all ages on our llama hikes, and children 5 and under are... Read More