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Take A Trip Into The Heart Of Romance

Take A Trip Into The Heart Of Romance

Take A Trip Into The Heart Of Romance Whether you’re looking for a cozy winter getaway or the ultimate romantic experience, Transylvania County has a keepsake box full of great ideas to help you show your sweetheart just how much you care. There’s no better place to up your romance game than in our area, especially in Brevard or historic Toxaway. Here are a few suggestions certain to score major points with your main squeeze. Snuggle Up From rustic cabins to luxury inns, our charming accommodations are sure to light your fire. A Great Gatsby-era, colonial revival treasure, The Bromfield Inn, just a short walk from downtown Brevard, offers luxurious accommodations in a beautiful park-like setting. For a wonderful massage nearby, Elements Wellness Spa in downtown is the perfect place to relax and refresh. If the Toxaway area is more your style, the lovely, historic Greystone Inn is a perfect getaway, where you can enjoy a side-by-side couple’s massage in the spa and then sit by the fire while over looking the lake. Brevard and Transylvania County offer a host of perfect love nests for your Valentine’s getaway. Click here to find your sweet spot, including our winter specials. Dinner Date A cozy, wonderful dinner is at the top of any Valentine’s celebration and for good reason. It’s a chance to connect and enjoy a special meal in a magical setting. If you’re in downtown Brevard, you’ll want to consider The Bohemian with its globally-inspired dishes, and Wild Morel with its French-and Italian-inspired rustic cuisine. In historic Toxaway,... Read More
Artful Adventures: Exploring the Arts in Brevard & Transylvania County

Artful Adventures: Exploring the Arts in Brevard & Transylvania County

Artful Adventures: Exploring the Arts in Brevard & Transylvania County Thanks to its surrounding natural beauty, Brevard has long attracted artists across every discipline, turning the area into a moveable feast of memorable art experiences. This month, the Adventurist sat down with Kathy King, Executive Director of the Transylvania Community Arts Council, to provide some insights into what makes our artistic community so special for residents and visitors alike. And since it’s getting to be “that time of year,” Kathy offered to provide some great shopping suggestions for those of you who are looking for that special something to slip under the Christmas tree.  Q&A Q&A: Kathy, tell us a little about yourself. Kathy has a fascinating background. She’s been a corporate attorney, a wedding and fine art photographer, and an educator. All three disciplines provided her with the perfect background to take over the reins of the Arts Council in 2021. She says, “It just seems like everything I have been doing led me to this place. I absolutely love the Arts Council, its mission, and what I do every day. And I wouldn’t be doing it if I didn’t!” Q&A Q&A: What is the Transylvania Community Arts Council? “Transylvania Community Arts Council was formed over fifty years ago and, initially, its primary purpose was holding an annual “Festival of the Arts.” In 1983, we received our 501(c)3 status and really began to expand. Today, one of the most important things we do is advocate for the arts... Read More
Keeping History Alive: How Brevard Became a Pioneering Civil Rights Community

Keeping History Alive: How Brevard Became a Pioneering Civil Rights Community

Keeping History Alive: How Brevard Became a Pioneering Civil Rights Community We invite you to learn more about a landmark effort by Brevard and Transylvania County’s African American citizens who made history – and the extraordinary African American community that is sharing their history in exciting new ways.   Pictured: Edith Darity Sometimes change requires courage. And tenacity. And an unwavering belief in the American Dream. Those are the qualities that describe Brevard’s African American community in the early 60s. At the time, virtually every school in the South was still segregated, despite the 1954 Brown vs. Board of Education decision handed down by the Supreme Court that declared segregated schools unconstitutional. In Brevard and Transylvania County, high school age African American students were bussed 42 miles every day to attend an all-Black high school in Henderson County. Enter Reverend Samuel A. Raper, who encouraged local African Americans to form the Transylvania Citizens Improvement Organization in 1960. After twice being turned down by the local Board of Education, these citizens took their case to the Federal Courts – and won – helping Transylvania County become the first desegregated school system in North Carolina. Brevard resident Edith Darity lived that history. For the first three years of high school, she was bussed to Henderson County. But for her senior year, in 1963, she attended Brevard High School as part of the first fully integrated class – all thanks to the landmark efforts of the Transylvania Citizens Improvement Organization. “Everything was... Read More
Chills & Thrills in Transylvania County

Chills & Thrills in Transylvania County

Chills & Thrills in Transylvania County With the Halloween season almost upon us, the Adventurist thought you might enjoy hearing about some of the spooky legends of Transylvania County. As Halloween approaches, we recomend you share these local stories around a campfire deep in the woods. And be sure to rustle up some s’mores to comfort your jangly nerves as you ponder those mysterious shadows that seem to be dancing out there in the darkness, just beyond the light cast by the flickering flames… The Legend of Tommy Hodges Transylvania County’s most famous, still unsolved case involves a young forestry student at the old Biltmore School (now the Cradle of Forestry) by the name of Tommy Hodges. The young man went missing one night, under mysterious circumstances, and was never found again. Every year, the Cradle of Forestry in Pisgah National Forest recreates this tale with an interactive, theatrical experience that invites audiences to truly become part of the tale. To find out the facts on Tommy Hodges and develop your own theories about what happened to him, direct your investigation here. The Headless Man of Williamson Creek Sometime during the Civil War, a group of Union soldiers were discovered camping alongside Williamson Creek near Brevard. Nearby Confederate officers were sent to investigate, and upon seeing the men, killed them. One of the soldiers was decapitated and when the bodies were buried, they could not find the head. Not long after that, locals began reporting mysterious sounds and occasional... Read More
The Legacy of Indigenous People in Transylvania County

The Legacy of Indigenous People in Transylvania County

The Legacy of Indigenous People in Transylvania County North Carolina has the largest population of Indigenous people east of the Mississippi River and the eighth-largest Indigenous population in the United States. With their rich and diverse cultures, traditions, and histories, Indigenous people have made important contributions to our state and county. As we celebrate North Carolina’s “Year of the Trail,” we’re delighted to share an interview we had with Keith Parker, whose fascinating and varied life experiences have contributed to his knowledge and insights about Indigenous cultures, specifically the Cherokee in Transylvania County. Keith grew up in Dunn’s Rock with Cherokee neighbors, absorbing their stories and mythologies. He graduated from Brevard High School and went on to earn B.A., B.D., Ph.D., and Dipl. Analytical Psychology degrees from multiple institutions, including Berea College, Southern Seminary, and the C.G. Jung Institute in Zurich. Keith’s educational pursuits were interrupted by a stint as a frogman for the Navy, where he led the primary emergency team for NASA’s Mercury program (counting astronaut John Glenn as a friend). Later, he taught counseling and history at a theological seminary in Zurich for more than two decades. In addition to publishing numerous articles on history, church history, and psychology, he has written extensively about Transylvania County and Cherokee history. Most notably, Keith is the author of Seven Cherokee Myths: Creation, Fire, the Primordial Parents, the Nature of Evil, the Family, Universal Suffering, and Communal Obligation. Q&A Q&A: Keith, tell us a little about your connection to... Read More
Forest Bathing: How To Cleanse Your Spirit

Forest Bathing: How To Cleanse Your Spirit

Forest Bathing: How To Cleanse Your Spirit As a part of North Carolina’s Year of The Trail celebration, “Wellness and Trails” is the theme for August. In conjunction with that theme, this month’s blog is about Forest Bathing, which has become a popular activity for folks who love the outdoors. If you’re new to the concept, you’ll enjoy this fascinating interview we conducted with Dr. Mattie Decker, a certified Nature and Forest Therapy Guide, mindfulness teacher and a retired professor of education.   Q&A Q&A: Mattie, tell us a little about yourself. “I’m a lifelong educator who grew up in Savannah, Georgia. I got my teaching degree from Georgia State University and then went on to teach in rural Appalachia in northeast Georgia. Later, I spent ten years in Colorado. I’ve always had a deep connection with nature, and Colorado deepened that relationship. Ultimately, we moved to Arkansas where I finished my master’s thesis. I then went on to pursue my doctorate at the University of Memphis. Over the years, I’ve also spent a great amount of time in Finland, studying and researching their innovative teacher education program. In Norway, I became a certified Nature and Forest Therapy Guide.” Q&A Q&A: What is forest bathing and how long has it been around? “Forest bathing is derived from the Japanese practice shinrin-yoku, which means forest bath. It was developed in the 80’s when Japan was in the midst of their tech boom. People were dying from a wide range of diseases in unprecedented numbers.... Read More
Year of the Trail: Wheely Fun

Year of the Trail: Wheely Fun

Memorable Road Rides: Wheely Fun Transylvania County has earned a worldwide — and well-deserved — reputation for itsspectacular mountain biking. Yet the road cycling opportunities here are just as rich, variedand rewarding, whether you’re a beginner to the sport, a dedicated club rider or a trainingprofessional. Here are three routes (easy, intermediate and challenging) that provide anexcellent introduction to two-wheeled travel in Transylvania County and give you theopportunity to celebrate North Carolina’s “Year of The Trail.” For more road cycling trails,check out Pisgah Map Company’s “Ride Transylvania” map, available here. 1. Easy Name: Walnut Hollow & East Fork River ValleyDistance: 26 milesElevation Gain: 1,542 feetType: Paved RoadStart: Downtown Brevard, Visitors Center Map and Elevation Profile Description:  Are you short on time but want to get in a good workout? This popular route fits the bill. Leaving downtown Brevard, enjoy a pleasant six-mile warm up before encountering the legendary climb up Walnut Hollow. But take heart: from the top of thisone-mile climb (average 7.6% gradient), it’s an invigorating descent down to the East Fork of the French Broad River and a scenic valley ride to Rosman and back to Brevard. 2. Intermediate Name: Headwaters LoopLevel: Easy-IntermediateDistance: 20.4 milesElevation Gain: 1,815 feetType: RoadStart: Champion Park, Rosman Map and Elevation Profile Description: While short, this route in the western part of Transylvania County possesses all the qualities that make the “Land of Waterfalls” such a special place to tour. You’ll find convenient parking at Champion Park in Rosman where this ride begins. Along... Read More
Kidding Around: Seven Sensational Family-Friendly Suggestions

Kidding Around: Seven Sensational Family-Friendly Suggestions

Kidding Around: Seven Sensational Family-Friendly Suggestions As we celebrate the Year of the Trail, it’s helpful to remember that some trails just go with the flow.  From the 3rd oldest river in the world to numerous tributaries and streams, there are multiple ways to get on the water in Transylvania County. Here are four great ways to enjoy our storied waterways. As we celebrate the Year of the Trail, it’s helpful to remember that some trails just go with the flow.  From the 3rd oldest river in the world to numerous tributaries and streams, there are multiple ways to get on the water in Transylvania County. Here are four great ways to enjoy our storied waterways.   One of Brevard’s special qualities is its appeal to visitors of every age. This is especially true for kids. Watching a child discover the many wonders of the outdoors is a gratifying experience to which any parent can attest. In addition, Brevard’s summer camps have welcomed children for more than 100 years, introducing them to exciting outdoor adventures like hiking, camping, rock climbing, paddling and more. But even shorter visits with family to Brevard can yield all manner of unforgettable joys, from finding a rare specimen at a gem mine to discovering the secret that explains why we have the largest concentration of waterfalls in North America (some 250 in all). Here are seven sensational suggestions for family-friendly experiences in Brevard that will leave a smile on everyone’s face and memories to... Read More
7 Easy Ways To Be Waterfall Wise

7 Easy Ways To Be Waterfall Wise

7 Easy Ways To Be Waterfall Wise As beautiful as our waterfalls are, they also represent hidden dangers. Every year, there are serious injuries and yes, sometimes even fatalities, experienced at our waterfalls. When visiting North Carolina’s Land of Waterfalls, enjoy our beautiful waterfalls, but remember they can be dangerous. Take personal responsibility and don’t take unnecessary risks. Put safety before selfies and follow our recommended safety tips to “Be Waterfall Wise”. If you do this, you will have a great time with awesome memories to share with all your friends and family. Using these safety tips and other educational efforts, the Transylvania County Tourism Development Authority works to raise awareness about the dangers of waterfalls through our sustainability committee, Transylvania Always and its “Be Waterfall Wise” program. You’ll also find helpful information, including a short educational video on our “Be Waterfall Wise” page.   Since 2016, we’ve been working with key partners including forest managers and supervisors at Pisgah National Forest, Gorges State Park, DuPont State Recreational Forest, Transylvania County EMS, Local Fire and Rescue workers/volunteers, Mission Health, and Local Law Enforcement to educate visitors about safe behavior around waterfalls. As a result, serious injuries and fatalities have declined. But even one incident is too many.   We also invite you to find out more about another important Transylvania Always initiative, “Leave It Better.” Inspired by the principles introduced by the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics, “Leave It Better” promotes six key principles that can help you be a responsible forest visitor.... Read More
Come to Your Senses

Come to Your Senses

Come to Your Senses When you venture into the woods to celebrate North Carolina’s Year of the Trail, we want you to have the richest and most rewarding experience possible. That’s why we’ve enlisted the help of Torry Nergart, conservation easement manager at Conserving Carolina, to give us some insights on how you can get the most from your time on Transylvania County’s treasured trails. ​ Q&A Q&A: Torry, why is it important to try and engage all five senses when you’re enjoying the outdoors? ​ “When I think about engaging the senses, I think about all five of them working together collectively. You could call that ‘mindfulness,’ and one of the easiest places to do that is in the forest. When we find natural connections, it gives us what we’re missing from modern living.” “Personally, I have to burn off a little energy before I can be more mindful. So, I do a trail run or bike a little bit. Both of these activities have a way of burning off a little of the busy-ness. It kind of rattles out the distractions. Then, I’m prepared to take a deep breath and engage all my senses.” Q&A Q&A: What are some plant and animal smells and scents we should be aware of when in the woods? ​ “It’s interesting.  When you’re trying to disconnect from the real world, you’re not turning anything off – you’re actually turning on your senses. And that’s especially true for the sense of smell.... Read More
“Leave It Better” And Be Like Trashsquatch

“Leave It Better” And Be Like Trashsquatch

“Leave It Better” And Be Like Trashsquatch We love Brevard and Transylvania County. And we know that you do, too. That’s why we introduced our “Leave It Better” initiative several years ago. It has been the Transylvania County Tourism Development Authority’s (TCTDA) most ambitious and wide-ranging effort to make a profound difference when it comes to protecting the natural resources that bring so much joy and relaxation to visitors. The TCTDA sustainability committee, Transylvania Always, inspired by the “Leave No Trace” principles, developed the “Leave It Better” campaign. Each year, millions of pounds of garbage are left behind in America’s forests, streams and rivers as visitors enjoy public lands. The “Leave It Better” initiative is designed to educate and encourage people to take responsibility for protecting and preserving these fragile natural assets. Transylvania County is over 50% public land, and is home to Pisgah National Forest, DuPont State Recreational Forest, Headwaters State Forest, and Gorges State Park. With the Transylvania Always “Leave It Better” campaign, the TCTDA hopes the public continues to help keep these public lands beautiful and accessible to everyone for years to come.   TS TS MEET TRASHSQUATCH The TCTDA’s Transylvania Always committee has its very own forest steward roaming our county. Trashsquatch, a mythical forest dweller, developed out of litter left by visitors to his home, asks public land users to “Leave It Better” and make trash as difficult to find as he is. While you may not see him in the woods, Trashsquatch has... Read More
Veterans History Museum of the Carolinas

Veterans History Museum of the Carolinas

Veterans History Museum of the Carolinas In 2017, the Veterans History Museum of the Carolinas opened in downtown Brevard. The museum is dedicated to honoring the veterans of our armed services from World War I to the present. In the six years since its opening, the museum has grown from a modest initiative to a truly impressive and ever-growing collection of valuable and meaningful military artifacts – from uniforms, medals and citations to a restored 1943 Willy’s Army jeep set against the backdrop of a military APO (American Post Office). We recently caught up with Emmett Casciato, founder and curator of the Veterans History Museum of the Carolinas for an insightful Q & A. Q&A Q&A: Emmett, how did you become interested in collecting military memorabilia? I’ve always been engrossed with military history, but I started collecting in 2000. I was teaching school in Florida and my daughter was in the Junior ROTC. I never served a day in my life. It was one of my major regrets. My dad served in WWII and my daughter served in Afghanistan after graduating from West Point. My son-in-law was a Blackhawk helicopter pilot. I said to myself, ‘If I didn’t serve, at least I can serve now in some way. Q&A Q&A: When did you make the decision to open a museum? It was about three years after I started collecting. My house had already become almost like a museum. One of my buddies, his father had served in the China-Burma-India... Read More